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Ezra Pound

The Return


See, they return; ah, see the tentative
Movements, and the slow feet,
The trouble in the pace and the uncertain
Wavering!

See, they return, one, and by one,
With fear, as half-awakened;
As if the snow should hesitate
And murmur in the wind,
and half turn back;
These were the "Wing'd-with-Awe,"
inviolable.

Gods of that wing├Ęd shoe!
With them the silver hounds,
sniffing the trace of air!

Haie! Haie!
These were the swift to harry;
These the keen-scented;
These were the souls of blood.

Slow on the leash,
pallid the leash-men!




Ballad of the Goodly Fere


Simon Zelotes speaking after the Crucifixion. Fere=Mate, Companion.

Ha' we lost the goodliest fere o' all
For the priests and the gallows tree?
Aye lover he was of brawny men,
O' ships and the open sea.

When they came wi' a host to take Our Man
His smile was good to see,
"First let these go!" quo' our Goodly Fere,
"Or I'll see ye damned," says he.

Aye he sent us out through the crossed high spears
And the scorn of his laugh rang free,
"Why took ye not me when I walked about
Alone in the town?" says he.

Oh we drank his "Hale" in the good red wine
When we last made company,
No capon priest was the Goodly Fere
But a man o' men was he.

I ha' seen him drive a hundred men
Wi' a bundle o' cords swung free,
That they took the high and holy house
For their pawn and treasury.

They'll no' get him a' in a book I think
Though they write it cunningly;
No mouse of the scrolls was the Goodly Fere
But aye loved the open sea.

If they think they ha' snared our Goodly Fere
They are fools to the last degree.
"I'll go to the feast," quo' our Goodly Fere,
"Though I go to the gallows tree."

"Ye ha' seen me heal the lame and blind,
And wake the dead," says he,
"Ye shall see one thing to master all:
'Tis how a brave man dies on the tree."

A son of God was the Goodly Fere
That bade us his brothers be.
I ha' seen him cow a thousand men.
I have seen him upon the tree.

He cried no cry when they drave the nails
And the blood gushed hot and free,
The hounds of the crimson sky gave tongue
But never a cry cried he.

I ha' seen him cow a thousand men
On the hills o' Galilee,
They whined as he walked out calm between,
Wi' his eyes like the grey o' the sea,

Like the sea that brooks no voyaging
With the winds unleashed and free,
Like the sea that he cowed at Genseret
Wi' twey words spoke' suddently.

A master of men was the Goodly Fere,
A mate of the wind and sea,
If they think they ha' slain our Goodly Fere
They are fools eternally.

I ha' seen him eat o' the honey-comb
Sin' they nailed him to the tree.

Comments

Wan Nor Azriq said…
Kebetulan,saya pun tengah membaca Ezra Pound.Kegemaran saya masih Wallace Stevens.

Wan Nor Azriq

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And The Moon And The Stars And The World, Charles Bukowski

Long walks at night--
that's what good for the soul:
peeking into windows
watching tired housewives
trying to fight off
their beer-maddened husbands.




Dan Bulan dan Bintang dan Dunia
karya Charles Bukowski

Perjalanan panjang di malam hari--
sungguh baik buat jiwa:
melongok melalui jendela
menyaksikan ibu rumah tangga kelelahan
mencoba menyingkirkan
suami-suami yang mabuk dan gila

Puisi Pringadi Abdi Surya, diterjemahkan oleh John H. McGlynn

The Last Rain in Memory

I will set aside this mist for you
until the time comes to meet
for leaves have only just begun to grow
after the curse of a century of drought
for my failure as a man to turn stones
into gold

an elderly alchemist named khidir
who disappeared into eternity
left a message for me:

even one drop of the bitter rain that fell that evening
is capable of becoming a new world

no one knows, I've even concealed my shadow
in that old and windowless house
and that I'm looking now for other shadows
cast by a woman with reddened lips

upon seeing her, the rain will lessen
and everyone will begin to affirm the feeling of pain

I will set aside this mist for you
until the time comes to meet
and the leaves that are styudying to write down names
don't come to know how your name is spelled

as death or as love

(2014)

John H. McGlynn adalah seorang penerjemah dan editor berkebangsaan Amerika yang telah tinggal di Indonesia sejak 1976.Selain sebagai Ketua Lontar[10], ia jug…